Thunar is a new modern file manager for the Xfce Desktop Environment. It has been designed from the ground up to be fast and easy-to-use. Its user interface is clean and intuitive, and does not include any confusing or useless options. Thunar is fast and responsive with a good start up time and directory load time.

Beside the basic file management features, Thunar includes additional features that set it ahead of other file managers available for the Unix/Linux desktop today. For example, Thunar includes a so called Bulk Renamer that allows users to easily rename multiple files at once using criterions that can be specified using the available renamer plugins. Probably the most interesting renamer here is the Audio Tags renamer, which generates new file names based on the tags present in audio files.

Install Thunar in Ubuntu Gnome

Just run the command in Applications -> Accessories ->Terminal:

sudo apt-get install thunar

Then find it under applications -> Accessories menu.

Make Thunar as default to open “Places” menu and files/folders than Nautilus

The default file manager in Ubuntu is Nautilus. If you prefer Thunar as default, paste this block of code into a text file and save it as a file named defaultthunar in your home folder.

## Originally written by aysiu from the Ubuntu Forums
## This is GPL’ed code
## So improve it and re-release it

## Define portion to make Thunar the default if that appears to be the appropriate action
## I went with –no-install-recommends because
## I didn’t want to bring in a whole lot of junk,
## and Jaunty installs recommended packages by default.
echo -e “\nMaking sure Thunar is installed\n”
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install thunar –no-install-recommends

## Does it make sense to change to the directory?
## Or should all the individual commands just reference the full path?
echo -e “\nChanging to application launcher directory\n”
cd /usr/share/applications
echo -e “\nMaking backup directory\n”

## Does it make sense to create an entire backup directory?
## Should each file just be backed up in place?
sudo mkdir nonautilusplease
echo -e “\nModifying folder handler launcher\n”
sudo cp nautilus-folder-handler.desktop nonautilusplease/

## Here I’m using two separate sed commands
## Is there a way to string them together to have one
## sed command make two replacements in a single file?
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/nautilus –no-desktop/thunar/g’ nautilus-folder-handler.desktop
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/TryExec=nautilus/TryExec=thunar/g’ nautilus-folder-handler.desktop
echo -e “\nModifying browser launcher\n”
sudo cp nautilus-browser.desktop nonautilusplease/
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/nautilus –no-desktop –browser/thunar/g’ nautilus-browser.desktop
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/TryExec=nautilus/TryExec=thunar/g’ nautilus-browser.desktop
echo -e “\nModifying computer icon launcher\n”
sudo cp nautilus-computer.desktop nonautilusplease/
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/nautilus –no-desktop/thunar/g’ nautilus-computer.desktop
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/TryExec=nautilus/TryExec=thunar/g’ nautilus-computer.desktop
echo -e “\nModifying home icon launcher\n”
sudo cp nautilus-home.desktop nonautilusplease/
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/nautilus –no-desktop/thunar/g’ nautilus-home.desktop
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/TryExec=nautilus/TryExec=thunar/g’ nautilus-home.desktop
echo -e “\nModifying general Nautilus launcher\n”
sudo cp nautilus.desktop nonautilusplease/
sudo sed -i -n ‘s/Exec=nautilus/Exec=thunar/g’ nautilus.desktop

## This last bit I’m not sure should be included
## See, the only thing that doesn’t change to the
## new Thunar default is clicking the files on the desktop,
## because Nautilus is managing the desktop (so technically
## it’s not launching a new process when you double-click
## an icon there).
## So this kills the desktop management of icons completely
## Making the desktop pretty useless… would it be better
## to keep Nautilus there instead of nothing? Or go so far
## as to have Xfce manage the desktop in Gnome?
echo -e “\nChanging base Nautilus launcher\n”
sudo dpkg-divert –divert /usr/bin/nautilus.old –rename /usr/bin/nautilus && sudo ln -s /usr/bin/thunar /usr/bin/nautilus
echo -e “\nRemoving Nautilus as desktop manager\n”
killall nautilus
echo -e “\nThunar is now the default file manager. To return Nautilus to the default, run this script again.\n”

echo -e “\nChanging to application launcher directory\n”
cd /usr/share/applications
echo -e “\nRestoring backup files\n”
sudo cp nonautilusplease/nautilus-folder-handler.desktop .
sudo cp nonautilusplease/nautilus-browser.desktop .
sudo cp nonautilusplease/nautilus-computer.desktop .
sudo cp nonautilusplease/nautilus-home.desktop .
sudo cp nonautilusplease/nautilus.desktop .
echo -e “\nRemoving backup folder\n”
sudo rm -r nonautilusplease
echo -e “\nRestoring Nautilus launcher\n”
sudo rm /usr/bin/nautilus && sudo dpkg-divert –rename –remove /usr/bin/nautilus
echo -e “\nMaking Nautilus manage the desktop again\n”
nautilus –no-default-window &

## The only change that isn’t undone is the installation of Thunar
## Should Thunar be removed? Or just kept in?
## Don’t want to load the script with too many questions?

## Make sure that we exit if any commands do not complete successfully.
## Thanks to nanotube for this little snippet of code from the early
## versions of UbuntuZilla
set -o errexit
trap ‘echo “Previous command did not complete successfully. Exiting.”‘ ERR

## This is the main code
## Is it necessary to put an elseif in here? Or is
## redundant, since the directory pretty much
## either exists or it doesn’t?
## Is there a better way to keep track of whether
## the script has been run before?
if [[ -e /usr/share/applications/nonautilusplease ]]; then





Make the script executable and run it:

chmod +x defaultthunar

To restore Nautilus file browser as default, run the script again: